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Utica's Velvet Ice Cream MillNortheast

Amish Country, Covered Bridge Country, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame! What more could you want? Northeast Ohio has plenty to offer visitors including Ohio's only National Park and major portions of the Erie Canal.

Topiary ParkCentral

At the very heart of Ohio is the state capital, the largest university in the country, and the theatre district. The area is home to some 2 million people that enjoy the unique gardens, open spaces, and the art centers.

Northwest

History and agriculture makes Northwest Ohio an interesting place to wander. It is rich, flat land that once was the bane of early settlers that tried to slog through its mucky swamps, but today, the swamps are gone and the area is one of the Midwest's major agricultural centers. It is also home to the world famous Cedar Point.

Union TerminalSouthwest

Airplanes, ancient civilizations, the Queen City and of course the world famous amusement parks make Southwest Ohio an interesting place to spend time.

The WildsSoutheast

Here are the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. The area has deep river gorges that snake through the hills. The Wilds is a new game preserve that allows visitors to get up close and personal.



Read More About Ohio's Historical Culture More Ohio History

MOUND BUILDERS

NATIVE OHIOANS /
NATIVE AMERICANS

OHIO'S NDIAN WARS

WAR OF 1812 IN OHIO

NATIONAL ROAD

OHIO'S GREAT CANALS

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

CIVIL WAR IN OHIO

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Ash Cave, Hocking Hills Hocking Hills

Towering cliffs and steep trails are features of the Hocking Hills. This is Ohio's backyard where we go to play. Spend a day or a week exploring the parks. B&Bs and quaint inns make the area a natural for wedding ceremonies with a twist.

North Coast

Our North Coast is our natural playground. Miles of beach and vineyards, some interesting and unique lighthouses, plus the islands that rival those islands to the south for nightlife and partying.

Along the North Coast is Ohio's playground. Cedar Point has become a roller-coaster mecca for thrill seekers from around the world.

Amish Country in OhioAmish Country

Amish Country: good food, attractions and some of the most beautiful country in the state.

 

 

Exploring Ohio's Regions

We've divided up the state into 6 different regions, each we feel provide visitors with a unique experience. The history of Ohio is also roughly divided into those same reasons, because the early settlers moving into the area came from distinct regions back east. That made Ohio a divided state that still exists today and helps explain why Ohio is so unique in the world of politics. While we're all Americans, we all known that there's a world of difference between us politically and that's the way it's always been.

Hopewell Mounds

Ohio's Rich Cultural History

Abundant north / south flowing rivers made Ohio easy to move from the vast lake regions to the north and the Ohio to the south. The expansive prairie lands to the west provided room for large herds of buffalo and deer, plus all those animals that prey on them.

The 4 season climate created an ideal climate for hunting and farming, which goes back some 14000 years just after the last ice age when the nomadic hunters began to create summer camps north of the Ohio River. As these camps grew in size, they became more permanent and large cities began to thrive. Then about 400 - 600 years these heavily populated cities disappeared. In time all that remained were the foundations of their civilization in the form of engineered earthen mounds designed to withstand the rigors of Ohio's climate, but not the demand for farm land several centuries later.

Mound Builders

Long before the first settlers came to Ohio, long before the first Native Americans began hunting in Ohio, there were hundreds of cities populating the state with a vast network of roads connecting them.

When the land was first surveyed by early settlers, detailed descriptions of these earthen mounds were made. In all, there were some 3000+ mounds and earthworks and no one at the time had a clue as to why they existed or who built them. Even the sparse populations of Native Americans living here at the time could not shed any light on who built them or why?

Today we know a bit more and their civilized culture that dates back 1000s of years. Why did they build mounds? Why did they suddenly disappear? Those answers haven't been answered, only speculated upon. What we do know is that from around 1200 A.D. to the early 1600s, this land was unoccupied by anyone. The ravages of weather erased their buildings leaving only hints of their existence and their centuries old culture.

Today, many of these historic sites have been preserved or recreated so that we can better appreciate those that came before us and those that come after us will also know their true Ohio Heritage.

William McKinley Campaign ButtonOhio Politics

Pioneers seeking adventure, more elbow room and a chance to lay claim to rich farm land for next to nothing heeded the magic words "go west" and headed for Ohio. Along with a few belongings they brought their politics.

Ohio politics have long been in the limelight. Eight presidents claimed Ohio as home or were born here. Three Vice Presidents were Ohioans. Even before Ohio became a state, politics played a big role in the state's formation.

When it came time for Congress to consider admitting the territory as a state, Arthur St. Clair, governor of the Northwest Territory, wanted the land divided into 2 states. Thomas Jefferson, with the consent of Thomas Worthington (Ohio's first governor) wanted one large state. Jefferson won the debate and Ohio became, well, Ohio.

Ohio politics are still divided. Northern Ohio is generally liberal. These folks came from New England. Southern Ohio was settled by Virginians and were primarily conservative. Central Ohio became a blend of the two. This is especially notable during presidential elections.